Health Care & Wildlife

posted: by: Rye Harrison Veterinary Hospital Tags: "Clinic Specials" "News" 

Health Care
Canine Health Care
Feline Health Care
Parrot Basics
Rabbit Basics
Guinea Pig Basics
Ferret Basics
Leopard Gecko Basics
Small Reptile Basics
Small Rodent Basics
Tortoise Basics
Water Turtle Basics
Boa and Python Basics
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Wildlife
Dr. John Pisciotta and Dr. Blair Green treat exotic pets at RHVH.  Often they are presented with wildlife animals that really do not need help. Wildlife babies usually have parents nearby, but people still mistake wildlife fledglings that are learning to be on their own as animals that are injured. We believe in humane, compassionate care for all animals—and so, we want you to know that it is best to leave wild animals alone unless you are absolutely certain that they need help.  The following pointers explain this in greater detail.
What to Do if You Find a Baby Mammal
What to Do if You Find a Baby Bird
What to Do if You Find an Injured Animal
What to Do if You Find a Turtle
What to Do if You Find a Marine Mammal
How to Make a Surrogate Nest
List of Wildlife Rehabilitators